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Articles from IEEE Electric Vehicle News

Ballard lands $17M deal for deployment of ~300 fuel cell buses in China; new 30 kW and 60 kW modules

Under a newly signed long-term license and supply agreement, Ballard Power Systems will supply Guangdong Synergy Hydrogen Power Technology Co., Ltd., an existing partner in China, fuel cell power products and technology in support of the planned deployment of approximately 300 fuel cell-powered buses in the cities of Foshan and Yunfu, China.

Volvo/KPMG analysis finds cities could save millions with electric buses instead of diesel

A city with half a million inhabitants would save about SEK 100 million (US$12 million) per year if the city’s buses ran on electricity instead of diesel, according to an analysis conducted in collaboration between the Volvo Group and the audit and advisory firm KPMG. The analysis has taken into consideration such factors as noise, travel time, emissions, energy use, taxes and the use of natural resources.

VW: ~5M VW vehicles affected by emissions scandal; working on technical solution; suspension of some employees starting

Volkswagen said that an internal assessment following the revelation of cheating on emissions testing in EA 189 2.0L diesels (earlier post) has concluded that approximately five million Volkswagen Passenger Cars brand vehicles are affected worldwi

California ARB to begin enhanced testing of modern light-duty diesel engines to detect emissions cheating (updated)

The California Air Resources Board sent a letter to automobile manufacturers notifying them that ARB will begin using enhanced testing procedures for modern light-duty diesel vehicles to determine compliance with emission levels to which they were originally certified.

5 Tips For Volkswagen’s New CEO

Matthias Müller has quite a mess on his hands.
As the newly appointed CEO of Volkswagen Group, Müller is walking into a position with 11 million emission-violating vehicles, a corporation facing fines and scandal, and an inevitable backlash that could take years to recover from.
But Müller said he is up to the challenge:

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